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Pet Tattoo Inspo: How to Personalize Your Pet Tattoo

Pet Tattoo Inspo

There is no doubt that a pet can make an incredible impact on your life. Though their time with you is temporary, there are several ways they can leave a permanent mark. One popular and creative form to memorialize your pet is with a tattoo.

Pet tattoos are personal, so take your time in customizing a piece unique to you and your pet. Make sure it’s a tattoo that you won’t regret later down the line. Some prefer to place an image or quote in a familiar setting for a whole year. If you still feel just as strongly about the piece, it’s probably safe to have it tattooed.

Because tattoos are so final, it is important that you take time in considering its placement. If your tattoo is exposed daily, people around you may think it is appropriate to ask you about what it is and what it means to you. If you don’t feel comfortable sharing, you may want to consider placing it in a more private space on your body.

There are so many creative ways to personalize your pet tattoo. Check out this list of styles, and find one that speaks to you!

If You Want Something Minimal

Tiny tattoos are perfect for those who can’t tolerate long periods of pain, work in an environment that doesn’t allow visible tattoos or simply prefer subtle forms of expression. They could be only an inch or two in length and only take about 5-20 minutes to ink, depending on the size and design. Larger minimal tattoos have little detail, like an outline. Consider getting a silhouette, small paw prints, initials or a geometric linework design that takes the shape of your pet.

If You Want Something Symbolic

If you love your pets, but you’re not fond of animal-themed tattoos, get a tattoo that reminds you of your pet in different way. Try finding a symbol that reminds you of your pet’s name or personality. If your cat loved climbing trees, or if your dog’s favorite outdoor activity was jumping into the ocean, research more images that associate with those memories. It’s indirect, but just as meaningful.

If You Want Something in Color

There are multiple different styles of tattoos you can get in color. Choosing the right style depends on your liking. Color realism, portrait and watercolor are three options that can help your tattoo pop. Usually these styles take up a lot of more space on your body, anywhere from a forearm to your entire back. The more space you use, the more clear it will look from afar. This also means you have a lot more options in terms of subject matter. If you’re looking to replicate an image of your pet or include them in a vibrant background, color tattoos are the way to go.

If You Want Something in Black and Gray

Even without color, black-and-gray tattoos can be just as outstanding. Plus, they don’t fade as easily. Portrait, fine line and dotwork are three unique styles you could choose from to personalize your tattoo. These tattoos can be any size. Just keep in mind that the more space you use, the clearer it will look from afar. This also means you have a lot more options in terms of subject matter.

If You Want Something Cute

A pet tattoo in general is already super cute. However, if you want to take it a step further, you can make it downright adorable by adding a new-school twist. New school is a type of style that uses a range of colors and exaggerates details of the subject, like a caricature. This style can easily accentuate your pup’s sweet eyes or your cat’s fluffy tail. You can also look at your favorite Disney or anime animal characters and form a design inspired by those features.

If You Want Something Funny

Commemorative tattoos are not necessarily sad in subject. In fact, it could even be humorous. You can dress up your pet from your favorite era with a leather jacket or even a monocle. Adding a sense of humor to your tattoo could help you smile every time you see it. It could also promote a more positive conversation when someone asks about it.

Do you have a pet tattoo? Let us know on Facebook!

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