Keeping Pets Safe During COVID-19

Keeping Pets Safe During COVID-19

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​Last updated on April 1st, 2020

"At this point, there is no evidence that companion animals can spread the virus"

​Center for Disease Control March 30th, 2020

Pet Hygiene during COVID-19

We want to first make clear that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as well as the American Veterinary Medical Association have both issued advisories saying there is no evidence that companion animals can spread the virus.


The CDC does, however, recommend pet owners practice good hygiene. Just like you can pick up germs at the supermarket, pets can pick up germs when they go outside. Good pet hygiene practices include:

  • Ensure you and your pet both maintain appropriate social distance from others while on walks (this also means no pets from neighbors).
  • Keep your pet on a leash at all times when outside to control where they travel
  • Avoid the dog park at your community, or anywhere dogs play unleashed
  • Wash your hands after interacting with or being around any pet (including your own)
  • Practice regular bathing for your pets
  • Clean pets’ paws after walks outside (use soap and water with baby wipes or puppy wipes, not harsh disinfectant wipes)
  • Avoid close face-cuddles and kisses from your pet. Just like your hands, pet noses and faces can carry germs.
  • For more information on staying safe and healthy around animals, visit CDC’s Healthy Pets, Healthy People website.

We want to first make clear that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as well as the American Veterinary Medical Association have both issued advisories saying there is no evidence that companion animals can spread the virus.


The CDC does, however, recommend pet owners practice good hygiene. Just like you can pick up germs at the supermarket, pets can pick up germs when they go outside. Good pet hygiene practices include:

  • Ensure you and your pet both maintain appropriate social distance from others while on walks (this also means no pets from neighbors).
  • Keep your pet on a leash at all times when outside to control where they travel
  • Avoid the dog park at your community, or anywhere dogs play unleashed
  • Wash your hands after interacting with or being around any pet (including your own)
  • Practice regular bathing for your pets
  • Clean pets’ paws after walks outside (use soap and water with baby wipes or puppy wipes, not harsh disinfectant wipes)
  • Avoid close face-cuddles and kisses from your pet. Just like your hands, pet noses and faces can carry germs.
  • For more information on staying safe and healthy around animals, visit CDC’s Healthy Pets, Healthy People website.

Pet Supplies and Records to Have Ready at Home

Just as we are stocking up (not hoarding) household staples and consciously reducing trips to the grocery store to minimize exposure, so should we prepare for our pets. We recommend pet parents have:

  • A two to four week supply of pet food and any medication your pets take. Remember, there are plenty of online ordering options to minimize in-store purchases. In fact, national sellers like Petco, Petsmart, Chewy, Krisers, and many of your local pet stores now offer national no-touch delivery and/or pick-up.
  • A copy of your current vaccine records should you need to take your pet to see a new vet, or engage in new vet telehealth options. Don’t have your records? Simply call or email your vet - most can quickly send you a digital copy.
  • A trusted backup caretaker identified and ready should you begin to exhibit symptoms and need to quarantine
  • A crate or carrier in case you need to move your pet.

Just as we are stocking up (not hoarding) household staples and consciously reducing trips to the grocery store to minimize exposure, so should we prepare for our pets. We recommend pet parents have:

  • A two to four week supply of pet food and any medication your pets take. Remember, there are plenty of online ordering options to minimize in-store purchases. In fact, national sellers like Petco, Petsmart, Chewy, Krisers, and many of your local pet stores now offer national no-touch delivery and/or pick-up.
  • A copy of your current vaccine records should you need to take your pet to see a new vet, or engage in new vet telehealth options. Don’t have your records? Simply call or email your vet - most can quickly send you a digital copy.
  • A trusted backup caretaker identified and ready should you begin to exhibit symptoms and need to quarantine
  • A crate or carrier in case you need to move your pet.

Planning for Your Pets Should You Become Ill

It's uncomfortable to imagine any of us becoming ill with COVID-19.  As responsible pet parents, however, there are certain steps we can take to ensure our furry family members will be taken care of.

  • Identify a family member or friend who can care for pets if someone in the household becomes ill.
    Have crates and a 30-day supply of food, litter and other supplies on hand for quick movement of pets.
  • Compile all vet records, ensuring they are up-to-date on vaccines as well in the event boarding becomes necessary.
  • Ensure all medications are documented with dosages and administering directions. Including the prescription from and contact information of your veterinarian.
  • Pets should have identification: collar with ID tag and microchip. Found Animals offers a free national microchip registry to all pet parents, no matter when or where they got their pet.

These may be unsettling times, but there is plenty we can do to protect ourselves and our loved ones (those with two and four legs).


Join our newsletter to continue to receive more helpful information about Pets and COVID-19


It's uncomfortable to imagine any of us becoming ill with COVID-19.  As responsible pet parents, however, there are certain steps we can take to ensure our furry family members will be taken care of.

  • Identify a family member or friend who can care for pets if someone in the household becomes ill.
    Have crates and a 30-day supply of food, litter and other supplies on hand for quick movement of pets.
  • Compile all vet records, ensuring they are up-to-date on vaccines as well in the event boarding becomes necessary.
  • Ensure all medications are documented with dosages and administering directions. Including the prescription from and contact information of your veterinarian.
  • Pets should have identification: collar with ID tag and microchip. Found Animals offers a free national microchip registry to all pet parents, no matter when or where they got their pet.

These may be unsettling times, but there is plenty we can do to protect ourselves and our loved ones (those with two and four legs).


Join our newsletter to continue to receive more helpful information about Pets and COVID-19


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